#AmazingPM, ALLinPPM, How-to, Knowledge, Project, Project for the web, project management, work management

Where is my project portfolio?

The Project for the web service from Microsoft is an intriguing project manager experience in the sweet spot between “back of the envelope” planning of Roadmap and Planner, best used perhaps for a sense of timing and high-level resource estimates, and the full rigor of project management with the comprehensive toolset of Project Online and its attention to details like costs, risks, issues, and resource workload management. Project for the web challenges the status quo for traditional users of enterprise PPM software with a simplified interface, easy to adopt, and an engine under the hood power users will love.Eoin11182019no1

Project for the web looks little like the Microsoft PPM tools familiar to most. At first, you may be lost looking for the projects you’ve created using Project for the web. You may find them on the Project Home page, under either the Favorites section (if you’ve marked any as a favorite) or in with the recently used or modified projects.eoin111819no2

You access Project Home by clicking the Project link in the App Launcher.eoin111819no3

The link to the Home page appears as a “home” icon: eoin111819no4 eoin111819no5

These out of the box views of Project for the web will no doubt be augmented soon by product offerings from Microsoft Partners, if such products have not been announced already. In the meantime, one can build one’s own applications to view, report on, and/or act on project data using the Common Data Service (CDS) and PowerApps. Here is a simple recipe to build a viewer for all the projects shared with you in Project for the web.

  1. Log in to O365 with credentials that can access Project Online and PowerApps.
  2. Launch PowerApps (powerapps.microsoft.com).
  3. Click Create then select Canvas app from blank.
  4. Name the app (e.g. “Pftw QuickView”) in the App Name* field, select the Tablet radio button, and click the Create (Skip the introductory tour if prompted). (Save the app (Click File, then Save) and autosave will begin to happen as you make changes moving forward.)
  5. On the Insert ribbon, select Vertical Gallery and a gallery screen will be added, populated with sample data. Search for the term “proj” in the data source dialog and notice the number of available CDS entities for Project.eoin111819no6
  6. Select the Project entity from the list of data sources and the vertical gallery display should switch from sample data to values from your Project environment and now you have a view listing all the projects in your portfolio!eoin111819no7
  7. All new projects created using Project for the web will generate an “Untitled project” project until the title is changed. If you want more detail than an untitled title, follow these steps:
    1. Rename the gallery you just created (e.g. “Gallery_MyPortfolio”).
    2. On the Insert ribbon, select Vertical Gallery and a new gallery screen will be added, again populated with sample data. Drag the new gallery side by side with the 1st gallery.eoin111819no8
    3. Rename the new gallery (e.g. “Gallery_ProjectTasks”). Change the new gallery items to be [“Portfolio_MyGallery”.Selected.’Project Tasks’]. In our example so far, if you used the same naming suggestions given, the Items for the Gallery_ProjectTasks gallery would be Gallery_MyPortfolio.Selected.’Project Tasks’.eoin111819no9
    4. You can make the viewer “prettier” and easier to understand by adding labels above each of the viewers and you can change the data fields that get shown.
    5. Press F5 to run the application to preview it works.
    6. Publish the application to share with whom you like if you like.

This has been a very brief overview describing one approach to viewing content in your Project for the web portfolio. Subsequent posts will show how to leverage not only the portfolio but also the Grid, the Board and the Timeline, as well as how to use Project for the web with robust project management techniques such as risk management.

#AmazingPM, ALLinPPM, Innovation, Knowledge, project management

Recognizing the Wins of Failure

We’ve all heard stories of famous failures – in sports, in music, in medicine, in invention…  our entertainment is replete with fictional versions of the same.  What is it that fascinates us about failure?  And how can we use failure as a springboard for success?

Most of us also remember first-hand experiences with failures of our own that shaped our lives.

 Here are a few of the gifts that failure offers.getty_168325476_349217

Failure Clarifies and Refines Motivation and Goals

Sometimes failure is an invitation to delve more deeply into a personal and profound understanding of the ancient Greek aphorism, “know thyself”.  Whether the failure is with the optimal recipe for your favorite desert, the design of an alternative energy mode of transportation, or an aspect of your interpersonal relationships, failure helps us to become clear on the fine details and essential elements of what you really want.

Failure Inspires and Fuels Determination and Stamina

There is nothing quite like falling on your face, literally or metaphorically, to connect with your grit!  Failure, especially public failure, is a situation most people typically find intensely uncomfortable.  These unpleasant feelings provoke an equally or more intense resolve to overcome the obstacles just encountered – along with any other potential roadblocks that may arise.  In this way, failure drives the perseverance required to get the job done.

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Failure Builds and Fortifies Courage and Action

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While anticipation of failure may lead to dithering indecision, actual failure, ironically, often leads to focused achievement in the face of fear.  The experience of failure alters your outlook on conceived outcomes.  If “the worst” has already happened, then you are more willing to risk ABC (Audacious-Bold-Courageous) measures towards the potential of living your goal.

So, now that you recognize the wins of failure, fail fast and fail often!!!

This piece was written by Sylvie Fortier, one of the Project Managers at Innovative-e. Sylvie Fortier is an experienced leader of culturally and geographically diverse technical and non-technical teams.  She has contributed to fledgling start-ups, Fortune 500 companies, and organizations in-between, supporting functions from strategy development to full product lifecycle management.  Whatever the role, Sylvie is passionate about cultivating creativity, innovation, and the pursuit of continuous improvement – for individuals, their teams, and society at large.  She is particularly fond of Thai food and delights in photography, travel, and SCUBA diving as well as everyday adventures with her teenage twins.